Hazwoper  Course

Our Hazcomm/Hazwoper courses have met the RI Department Of Health approval for Continuing education credits

What is HAZWOPER?

OSHA issued the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) standards, 29 CFR 1910.120 and 29 CFR 1926.65 (54 Federal Register 9294-9336, March 6, 1989), to protect workers and enable them to handle hazardous substances safely and effectively. The HAZWOPER standard for the construction industry (29 CFR 1926.65) is identical to 29 CFR 1910.120. For brevity, the HAZWOPER standard is referenced as 29 CFR 1910.120 throughout the remainder of this web page.

The HAZWOPER standard covers employers performing the following general categories of work operations:

  • Hazardous waste site cleanup operations [paragraphs (b) – (o)];
  • Operations involving hazardous waste that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities [paragraph (p)]; and
  • Emergency response operations involving hazardous substance releases [paragraph (q)].

The HAZWOPER standard provides employers, emergency response workers, and other workers potentially exposed to hazardous substances information and training criteria to improve workplace safety and health and reduce workplace injuries and illnesses that could occur from exposures to hazardous substances. It is critical that employers and their workers understand the scope and application of HAZWOPER, and can determine which sections apply to their specific work operations.

Per the OSHA website – the HAZWOPER standard covers five distinct categories of work operations:

  1. Cleanup operations required by a governmental body involving hazardous substances conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites;
  2. Corrective actions involving cleanup operations at RCRA-covered sites;
  3. Operations involving hazardous wastes at TSD facilities;
  4. Operations that generate hazardous waste but are not TSD facilities; and
  5. Emergency response operations involving releases of hazardous substances.

The Global Harmonized System (GHS) is an International approach to hazard communication. It is based on major existing systems around the world, including OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HazComm) and the chemical classification and labeling systems of other US agencies. This training program explains how to comply with the GHS changes and compliance requirements under the 2012 OSHA’s Hazardous Communication standard.

This program is aimed at the worker or handler of hazardous chemicals and provides the participants with general awareness training under OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1200. Each participant will leave the classroom with a general awareness of the GHS and how to apply it in their workplace.

Within the program, the instructor will review OSHA’s 2012 HazComm standard and highlight the changes applicable under the new GHS standard.

Upon successful completion of this course, participants will be able to describe the key elements of OSHA’s Hazard Communication standard revisions.

We offer several courses to assist you in obtaining the necessary training to meet OSHA requirements.

  • 24-Hour HAZWOPER Training Course (3 Days)
    OSHA 29CFR 1910.120, the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) standard states that 24-hours of HAZWOPER training is the minimum requirement for those employees whose job does not require them to handle waste or hazardous materials as part of their job. However, if they are required to respond to such incidents as uncontrolled releases or the potential of uncontrolled releases, they must respond as first responders to control and possibly perform cleanup operations. This 24-hour class is not designed to be as in-depth as the 40-hour HAZWOPER course.
    Sign up now

  • 40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)
    Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.
    Sign up now

  • HAZWOPER Refresher FRA/FRO/HMT (8 Hours)
    Anyone who has taken the 40-hour HAZWOPER course is required to maintain their certification by taking an 8-Hour annual refresher course. This course satisfies this requirement. Students who successfully complete this course will receive a certificate of completion from UASC. Those employees who require Hazard Communication Training may join the class for the first 2-hours. The first 4-hours will satisfy requirements for FRO, and completion of the 8-hour course will satisfy requirements for HMT.
    Sign up now

40 Hour EM-385 Compliance Course – (5 Days)

This course is designed for those who will be performing the duties as a Site Safety and
Health Officer (SSHO) on a United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) government
project under EM-385 requirements. The course will earn both an OSHA outreach
Construction 30- hour Department of Labor (DOL) card and proof of the documented 40
hours training required under EM-385.

Topics: 

  • Preparation of Site-Specific Accident Prevention Plan (APP) EM-385 01.A.11
  • Site Safety Health Officer’s Qualifications & Responsibilities EM-385 01.A.17
  • Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) development EM-385 01.A.13
  • Cranes and Rigging EM-385 15+16
  • Personnel training EM-385 01.B
  • Emergency planning and response EM-385 01.E+F
  • Site auditing/inspection and deficiency identification process EM-385 01.A.2
  • Requirements of the Fall protection Program EM-385 section 21
  • Accident reporting and Recordkeeping EM-385 01.D
  • UASCE EM-385 specific requirements beyond OSHA
  •  Specific sections upon customer request
  • Any recent changes to the EM 385-1-1

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who are assigned to be SSHO, Supervisors or Program
Managers on a United States Army Corps of Engineers project complying with Em-385
regulations.  Regulatory Requirements: OSHA 29CFR 1926;EM-385 and various ANSI standards.

Class Hours:

8:00AM to 4:30PM each day

EM-385 Annual Refresher Course (8 Hours)

This course is designed for those who have completed the 40 hour course and will continue
performing the duties as a Site Safety and Health Officer (SSHO) on a United States Army
Corps of Engineers (USACE) government project under EM-385 requirements.
Review

Topics: 

  • Preparation of Site-Specific Accident Prevention Plan (APP) EM-385 01.A.11
  • Site Safety Health Officer’s Qualifications & Responsibilities EM-385 01.A.17
  • Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) development EM-385 01.A.13
  • Cranes and Rigging EM-385 15+16
  • Personnel training EM-385 01.B
  • Emergency planning and response EM-385 01.E+F
  • Site auditing/inspection and deficiency identification process EM-385 01.A.2
  • Requirements of the Fall protection Program EM-385 section 21
  • Accident reporting and Recordkeeping EM-385 01.D
  • UASCE EM-385 specific requirements beyond OSHA
  • Specific sections upon customer request
  • Any recent changes to the EM 385-1-1

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who completed the 40 hour within the last 12 months and
need to maintain competency with the EM-385 required documented training.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1926; United States Army Corps of Engineers
(USACE) EM-385 and various ANSI standards.

Class Hours:

8:00AM to 4:30PM

40 Hour EM-385 Compliance Course – (5 Days)

This course is designed for those who will be performing the duties as a Site Safety and
Health Officer (SSHO) on a United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) government
project under EM-385 requirements. The course will earn both an OSHA outreach
Construction 30- hour Department of Labor (DOL) card and proof of the documented 40
hours training required under EM-385.

Topics:
Preparation of Site-Specific Accident Prevention Plan (APP) EM-385 01.A.11
Site Safety Health Officer’s Qualifications & Responsibilities EM-385 01.A.17
Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) development EM-385 01.A.13
Cranes and Rigging EM-385 15+16
Personnel training EM-385 01.B
Emergency planning and response EM-385 01.E+F
Site auditing/inspection and deficiency identification process EM-385 01.A.2
Requirements of the Fall protection Program EM-385 section 21
Accident reporting and Recordkeeping EM-385 01.D
UASCE EM-385 specific requirements beyond OSHA
Specific sections upon customer request
Any recent changes to the EM 385-1-1

Who Should Attend:
Employees who are assigned to be SSHO, Supervisors or Program
Managers on a United States Army Corps of Engineers project complying with Em-385
regulations.

Regulatory Requirements:
OSHA 29CFR 1926;EM-385 and various ANSI standards.

Class Hours:

8:00am – 4:30pm each day

OSHA 10 Hour Construction (2 Days)

OSHA 10 Hour Construction certification is mandatory for all workers on all municipal and state construction projects in Massachusetts, as well as other states. Don’t limit yourself by not having this vital OSHA certification. The OSHA 10 Construction Outreach course is a 2-day course that covers: intro to OSHA, the focus four hazards, trenching and excavating, material handling, scaffolds, personal protective equipment (PPE), among other topics. Attendees who complete this course will receive their OSHA 10-Hour certification.

Class Hours:

Day 1:  8:00am – 4:30pm
Day 2:  8:00am- 10:45am

OSHA 30 Hour Construction (4 Days)

General contractors, foremen and construction health and safety personnel- ensure the safety of your workers and reduce workers compensation claims by completing your OSHA 30 Hour Construction certification. This four day course will cover the OSHA 29 CFR 1926 Construction standards in depth, including the focus four hazards. Attendees will learn about health and safety programs. Upon completion of this course, attendees will receive their OSHA 30 Construction certification.

Class Hours:

8:00am – 4:30pm each day

Workplace Safety Handbook with OSHA Requirements next to A First Aid Kit, Respirator Face Piece, Hart Hat, and Safety Gloves

A Quick Guide on OSHA Safety Requirements

Weeding through letters of interpretation or researching OSHA standards for a quick answer can eat up precious time. This is why UASC’s safety consultants and training department wanted to provide you with a quick reference guide on our most commonly asked OSHA reporting, recording, and training questions.

Breaking Down What OSHA Wants

OSHA can be ambiguous in what they want in some cases. This is done intentionally so that workers have the most protection possible. However, there are some things that are black and white for employers to follow to help ensure the minimum requirements are being met. It’s important to ensure that your company is operating as safely as possible and our team is ready to help provide you with written health and safety plans (HASP), training, consulting, or a safety manager. In the meantime, here’s the bare minimum.

Companies are required to have a written safety program no matter what sector or industry they’re in. These help their employees work in the safest manner possible, and, per OSHA, must include the following topics:

  • Emergency Action Plan (EAP)
  • Fire Prevention Plan
  • Hazard Communication Program (HazComm)
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Lock-out/Tag-out (LOTO)

Beyond this, established safe work practices are required for all tasks. Additional written plans or supportive documentations may be required, which depends on the task(s), duties, or environment. A professional safety consultant can easily walk you through these steps to ensure full compliance, but this is a great starting point.

Simplifying Company Safety Plans

There are also required written safety programs when they’re applicable to your company’s work environment. If your employee’s job requires them to use any of the following, then you need to have a written safety plan.

  • Respirator Program
  • Bloodborne Pathogens Plan (BBP)
  • Firearm Safety Program
  • Firearm Range Safety Program
  • Aerial Lift Program
  • Trench Safety Program
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces Program
  • Asbestos Management Plan
  • Hearing Conservation Program
  • Arc Flash Program

Maintaining Up-to-Date Training Certifications

Once the safety plans and programs are written, you now need to teach them to your employees to ensure full understanding and compliance. Some of these areas require specific training to ensure full compliance, which often comes with a required “retraining” date to ensure all employees have a refresher to maintain the information. Should you make any of your policies, even if they just had the training a few weeks ago, then a new training session needs to happen to ensure complete compliance. Many companies choose to hire a third party instructor to deliver the content to their employees so that it’s coming from an outside source who has experience with OSHA regulations and training, such as UASC.

TopicFrequency
Asbestos Cement Pipe (water/sewer)Every 5 Years
Bloodborne Pathogens (BBP)Annual
Fire Extinguisher Annual
Forklift Training (PIV or PIT) Every 3 Years
Hazardous Waste Annual
Hearing ConservationAnnual
Respirators Annual

*An OSHA 10 or 30 Hour course does not satisfy job-specific training as it is simply an overview and not specific to job tasks. Looking to fulfill your training needs? Visit our calendar full of upcoming public courses, or check out our online and private course catalogs.

In addition to written safety manuals/policies and job specific training, inspections play a key part in keeping a worker safe. These inspections need to happen prior to each use with proper documentation, showing it’s been completed and the condition of the item is noted. OSHA requires the following items to always be routinely inspected and removed from service if they’re deemed damaged in any way.

Routine Inspections

Chains and SlingsFire Extinguishers
Cranes/HoistsLadders
Electrical GFCIMachine Guard
Emergency Detection
(lights, alarms, monitors, etc.)
Emergency Supplies
(First Aid, AED, eyewash, etc.)
Personal Arrest Fall ProtectionVehicles and Equipment

OSHA Assistance and Resources

These lists are provided as a courtesy to help understand what is required of companies per OSHA and OSHA may change their requirements at any time; thus, it is always important to have a safety consultant on hand to ensure complete compliance. Please feel free to reach out to us with any questions you may have regarding your safety manuals, policies, training, or inspections by visiting our website or giving us a call (774-302-4305). Providing a safe work environment ensure your employees go home to their families each day.

Active Shooter Holding Gun Behind Back

Complete Your Safety Manual by Including an Active Shooter Program

Just like you can’t prevent a workplace injury, you can’t predict an active shooter incident, which seems to be more rampant in recent years. Companies have in place safety manuals to reduce workplace injuries, consistent job hazard analysis (JHA’s) that lists the hazards with precautions to prevent them, and training for various job tasks to ensure safety. But where does active shooter fall into place? It isn’t something that should be included in your company safety manual, right?

Profiling Active Shooters and Targets

Wrong. The current belief is that active shooter trainings and policies/procedures should be included as part of the safety training in an effort to reduce and diffuse potential situations as 45% of active shooter incidents occur in the workplace. Active shooters are difficult to profile because it’s usually an irrational, random target. Profilers share that active shooters tend focus on “soft targets”, which includes crowded open spaces and a lack of security. This makes construction sites, lumber yards, and the likes a bit more of a potential target.

Active Shooter Training Reduces Injury and Fatality Outcomes

When there’s an injury on a job-site, the staff is often trained to handle the situation, including tourniquet use. Active shooter training is similar. It presents how to respond in the situation, such as the 4 Steps That Can Save Your Life If Confronted By An Active Shooter. Also, what NOT to do in the situation, and how to mitigate the effects through expert input. By having this training, the fatality and injury outcome is potentially reduced. Even better, some incidents may be avoided by looking for key signs that many active shooters exhibit.

Importance of Employee Assistance Programs in Place for Active Shooter Events

Just like with other safety training and policies, it’s important to include how a company plans to handle the aftermath of an event. These devastating scenarios often require trained employees helping to treat the injured, but it goes beyond that as well. Will the company offer counseling options through an Employee Assistance Program? Will they hire on a trained mental health provider? This seems to be the area where many companies are falling behind in the active shooter safety policies. It’s critical to ensure how the aftermath will be handled by the company for employees to reference.

OSHA’s Stance on Preparing for Active Shooters in the Workplace

In short, providing necessary training for employees can help reduce injuries and fatalities in the event of an active shooter situation and harness them with the ability to potentially survive the devastating event. By incorporating a game plan for the aftermath of an event, employees can easily know how their company will support them within the months after an event, just as they do for every other injury. Plus, there’s different schools of thought on whether the OSHA General Duty Clause 5(a)(1) comes into play, but the general consensus is that it does. The General Duty Clause states that employers must provide employees with a place of employment that is “free from recognizable hazards that are causing or likely to cause death or serious harm to people.” Once an employee has showed signs indicating possible workplace violence, the employer needs to take action. Having the training and plan ready to go, falls into that category.


While active shooters are unpredictable, your safety manual and training doesn’t have to be. Be sure to work with a seasoned training company who can help you with either onsite or public training, as well as the policy for your safety manual. Together, we can mitigate reduce the devastating possibility.

24-Hour HAZWOPER Training Course (3 Days)

OSHA 29CFR 1910.120, the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) standard states that 24-hours of HAZWOPER training is the minimum requirement for those employees whose job does not require them to handle waste or hazardous materials as part of their job. However, if they are required to respond to such incidents as uncontrolled releases or the potential of uncontrolled releases, they must respond as first responders to control and possibly perform cleanup operations. This 24-hour class is not designed to be as in-depth as the 40-hour HAZWOPER course.

Topics:
Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend:
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements:
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00AM to 5:00PM each day

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics:
Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend:
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements:
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00AM to 5:00PM each day

OSHA 30 Hour General Industry (4 Days)

Manufacturing, healthcare, hospitality and janitorial supervisors all need to stay up to date on the latest safety information. Reducing hazards and injuries for your employees keeps them safe, while lowering your workers’ compensation claims, and missed days from work. An OSHA 30 General Industry certification is highly valued by employers, and can help you get ahead in any of these fields. This four day course will cover the OSHA 29 CFR 1910 general industry standards, and attendees will learn the elements of an effective Health and Safety program. Upon completion attendees will receive their OSHA 30 Hour General Industry Certification.

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 4:30 pm each day

OSHA 10 Hour General Industry (2 Days)

Do you work in the manufacturing, healthcare, hospitality, or janitorial industry? Do you know how to keep yourself safe from blood borne pathogens, hazardous chemicals, strains and injuries? Employers want safe workers, and are looking to hire OSHA certified professionals. This two day course will prepare you to work safely in your job, and you will attain your OSHA 10 Hour General Industry certification.

Class Hours:

Day 1:  8:00am – 4:30pm
Day 2:  8:00am- 10:45am