40 Hour EM-385 Compliance Course – (5 Days)

This course is designed for those who will be performing the duties as a Site Safety and
Health Officer (SSHO) on a United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) government
project under EM-385 requirements. The course will earn both an OSHA outreach
Construction 30- hour Department of Labor (DOL) card and proof of the documented 40
hours training required under EM-385.

Topics: 

  • Preparation of Site-Specific Accident Prevention Plan (APP) EM-385 01.A.11
  • Site Safety Health Officer’s Qualifications & Responsibilities EM-385 01.A.17
  • Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) development EM-385 01.A.13
  • Cranes and Rigging EM-385 15+16
  • Personnel training EM-385 01.B
  • Emergency planning and response EM-385 01.E+F
  • Site auditing/inspection and deficiency identification process EM-385 01.A.2
  • Requirements of the Fall protection Program EM-385 section 21
  • Accident reporting and Recordkeeping EM-385 01.D
  • UASCE EM-385 specific requirements beyond OSHA
  •  Specific sections upon customer request
  • Any recent changes to the EM 385-1-1

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who are assigned to be SSHO, Supervisors or Program
Managers on a United States Army Corps of Engineers project complying with Em-385
regulations.  Regulatory Requirements: OSHA 29CFR 1926;EM-385 and various ANSI standards.

Class Hours:

8:00AM to 4:30PM each day

40 Hour EM-385 Compliance Course – (5 Days)

This course is designed for those who will be performing the duties as a Site Safety and
Health Officer (SSHO) on a United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) government
project under EM-385 requirements. The course will earn both an OSHA outreach
Construction 30- hour Department of Labor (DOL) card and proof of the documented 40
hours training required under EM-385.

Topics:
Preparation of Site-Specific Accident Prevention Plan (APP) EM-385 01.A.11
Site Safety Health Officer’s Qualifications & Responsibilities EM-385 01.A.17
Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) development EM-385 01.A.13
Cranes and Rigging EM-385 15+16
Personnel training EM-385 01.B
Emergency planning and response EM-385 01.E+F
Site auditing/inspection and deficiency identification process EM-385 01.A.2
Requirements of the Fall protection Program EM-385 section 21
Accident reporting and Recordkeeping EM-385 01.D
UASCE EM-385 specific requirements beyond OSHA
Specific sections upon customer request
Any recent changes to the EM 385-1-1

Who Should Attend:
Employees who are assigned to be SSHO, Supervisors or Program
Managers on a United States Army Corps of Engineers project complying with Em-385
regulations.

Regulatory Requirements:
OSHA 29CFR 1926;EM-385 and various ANSI standards.

Class Hours:

8:00am – 4:30pm each day

Worker using fall protection gear as a safety precaution he learned in em 385 training

UASC filling in EM385 FP Training lack in Northeast

It’s a training requirement that has hit many construction supervisor or project manager’s site; yet, it still seems to be one of those trainings that is not widely offered, even here in the Northeast. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has a 900-page manual that outlines the safety regulations for their job-sites, with many of the requirements being a bit stricter than OSHA regulations. Every contractor and subcontractor on a UASCE-overseen job-site must have at least one person who is trained and competent on the specifics buried within those 900 pages of their Engineer Manual (EM) 385-1-1. There’s no getting out of it.

PM’s Need for EM 385 Training

Given the amount of daily phone calls we receive from PMs who need the training ASAP in order to return to work, the UASCE has become more stringent on ensuring this training is completed. They are also doling out some hefty fines as well as issuing stop orders until the mandates are met – especially if you don’t have designated safety personnel on-site. Thankfully, we have several highly competent and trained construction professionals who have poured over the complete 900 pages and have designed a training program that ensures compliance. Our EM 385 Compliance training, often referred to as 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection, is one of our most sought out trainings – often after being kicked off a job site. Those same trainers are able to also assist on meeting the requirements of having a Site Safety and Health Officer (SSHO) and Quality Control Manager, Quality Assurances Manager (QA/QC) on-site quickly.

Federal Bid Requirement

If you’re planning on bidding on a federal contract that takes place in Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York and New Jersey or on any of the bases listed below, be sure to reach out to us to secure your training. This will no doubt save your company money, fines, and lost work-time and make you the star employee of the week. We can promise you that somewhere, tucked away in the fine print, the USACE requires you to have at least one person training in EM 385, 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection on your site at ALL times. There aren’t any loopholes or fast-talking yourself out of the requirement. It also doesn’t exempt you from following OSHA regulations and our course clearly outlines the differences between the two. Because of this, we strongly recommend that all persons in our EM 385 training also have completed their OSHA 10 Hour Construction training. For an added peace of mind, we strongly recommend you train multiple employees to ensure that you always have someone available in case of injury, illness, or time off requests.

We’ve clocked thousands of hours of training on this topic at various bases and our experts can help your team members understand the complexities of the UASCE requirements, ensure their fall arrest systems are safe and in compliance, and know their responsibilities on a job site.

Projects on Bases

If you have any upcoming projects in VT, NH, MA, RI, CT, NY or NJ at any of these bases*, be sure to call us today to secure your training dates or SSHO and/or QA/QC needs:

Massachusetts

Barnes Air National Guard Base, Westfield, MA
Otis Air National Guard Base, Buzzards Bay, MA
Hanscom Airforce Base, Bedford, MA
Westover Air Reserve Base, Chicopee, MA
Fort Devens, Devens, MA
AIRSTA Cape Cod, Buzzards Bay, MA
AIRSTA Salem, Salem, MA
Aviation Station Ten Pound Island, Gloucester, MA

Rhode Island

Quonset Point Air National Guard Station, North Kingstown, RI
NS Newport, Newport RI

Connecticut

Marine Safety Center Marine Base in Groton, CT
Research And Development Center Coast Guard Groton, CT
Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT
Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, CT

New York

Fort Drum Army Base in Jefferson, NY
Fort Hamilton Army Base in Brooklyn, NY
US Military Academy Army Base in West Point, NY
Watervilet Arsenal Army Base in Watervilet, NY

New Jersey

McGuire Air Force Base in New Hanover, NJ
Fort Dix Army Base in Burlington, NJ
Fort Monmouth Army Base in Monmouth, NJ
Picatinny Arsenal Army Base in Morris County, NJ
Loran Support Unit Coast Guard Base in Wildwood, NJ
Training Center Cape May Coast Guard Cape May, NJ
NWS Earle Navy Base in Colts Neck, NJ
NAES Lakehurst Navy Base in Lakehurst, NJ

*This is not a complete list of military bases

To sign up for an EM385 24 Hour Fall Protection Training Class, visit our website. To sign up for the next public class offering at United Alliance Services Corporation, visit our online calendar. For more information, call 774-302-4305.

Man in a hardhat standing inside a warehouse

Adjusted OSHA Penalties for 2019

OSHA has increased the maximum fines

The maximum fines are now $132,598 per violation for willful or repeated violations for a company, and $13,260 per violation for serious, Other-than-Serious, and Posting violations.

Companies can have multiple violations from one OSHA inspection

For repeated violations, it doesn’t matter that the violation happened at another location of a company.  It is a repeated violation when one location has been issued the violation and a different branch has the same violation.

Failure to abate Violation

The penalty is increased to $13,260 per day beyond the abatement date.  For this reason, it is important to correct OSHA violations and document it back to them with the paperwork that they provide. Then be sure that the corrections are maintained.
For help monitoring job sites, please call United Alliance Services because we conduct documented safety audits of company workplaces and job sites as part of stand-alone auditing services and our annual packages.
For more info on this click here!
8-steps-to-an-effective-workplace-health-and-safety-program-1-opt

8 Steps to an Effective Workplace Health and Safety Program

An effective health and safety program has several key objectives: to prevent injuries and illnesses, to improve compliance with laws and regulations, to reduce costs spent on workers’ compensation, and to increase general productivity. Health and safety should be one of the key foundations of your company culture. If you want to create a health and safety program that effectively accomplishes those objectives, follow these 8 steps!

  1. Establish Health and Safety and Company Core Values

When you speak to your employees (whether they be new hires or lifelong employees), make sure to emphasize the importance of health and safety. Health and safety should be company objectives, just like customer service or quality work.

  1. Lead by Example

Always follow your own health and safety protocols. Make sure to explain why you take certain measures to improve safety. If your employees see by your actions that you genuinely value health and safety, they will follow suit.

  1. Implement a Reporting/Suggesting System

Make sure that your employees feel comfortable reporting health/safety infractions and making suggestions on how to improve protocol. Set up a reporting/suggesting system that gives your employees a private way to speak about health/safety concerns. Your workers will likely identify safety risks that you never knew about, but only if you encourage them to.

  1. Provide Training

Safety training sessions are essential to demonstrate your commitment to workplace safety and to make sure employees continue to follow through with the rules. Show employees the protocol for dealing with hazards, reporting injuries/near misses, etc.

  1. Conduct Regular Inspections 

Regular workplace inspections are necessary to identify potential hazards. Don’t do them alone; bring your workers with you for workplace inspections so that they know what to look for. They may identify hazards that you would have missed.

  1. Address Emergencies

Have a protocol set for every foreseeable emergency and follow them strictly when an incident occurs.

  1. Seek Input On Workplace/Procedure Changes

Before making significant changes to the workplace or to regular procedures, consult with your employees; they may identify potential health/safety hazards, which may change your course of action.

  1. Keep Improving 

Set aside a regular, scheduled time to meet with employees to discuss workplace health and safety. Take suggestions, discuss incidents/near misses, and never stop improving your health and safety program.

Learn more about workplace health and safety here: https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/
Trade Show info

Our New Division OccuMed at OSAP Boot Camp 2019

Our New Division, OccuMed of New England will travel to Atlanta, Georgia in 2019 to attend the OSAP Dental Infection Control Boot Camp. The educational course covers all basics in infection prevention and safety. The boot camp will be held at the InterContinental Buckhead Atlanta. It will run from Wednesday-Friday, January 23-25.

Who’s Attending OSAP?

From OccuMed of New England, Valerie Bianco, CEO and President, and Brenna Maloney, Director of Operations, will be in attendance. We will take back key information on infection control, standard precautions, patient and employee safety, and much more back to our team in East Wareham, Massachusetts. Infection control coordinators, educators, compliance officers, federal service employees, Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) personnel, consultants and sales representatives will be in attendance as well.

Why We’re Going

Industry standards and regulations are always changing and improving. To stay up-to-date with our compliance programs, audit tools, and training seminars, we must stay informed about the on-going industry advancements. The course, which offers 24+ hours of CE credit, will highlight all aspects of infection control, the chain of infection and the roles of infection control coordinators. OccuMed of New England is especially excited to hear about lab safety, dental unit waterlines and amalgam, and surveillance and breaches in infection control in dentistry.

To hear more about OccuMed’s trip to Atlanta to the OSAP Infection Control Boot Camp, visit our website and keep an eye out for OccuMed at OSAP Boot Camp 2019: Key Takeaways. For more information on the boot camp, or instructions on how to register, visit www.osap.org.